Working in Brazilian Daycare

 

Hi everyone, it’s my fourth day in Brazil. I haven’t just been on vacation in Brazil, but I have also been doing some volunteer work. Monday, I started working in a Brazilian daycare center where I am assisting the teachers. I care for toddlers ages 2-3. If I had my preference, I would work with 6-7 year old because they are at an age where they can focus a bit more and learn actual school things whereas with toddlers you have to baby them the whole time, so there isn’t much teaching or anything going on, even though “technically,” we’re supposed to be teaching English. Don’t get me wrong, the babies are adorable and as soon as I came in, they gave me a hug. They call all the teachers/ volunteers “tia,” or “tio.”

They are adorable, but toddlers…I generally don’t work with them, but I manage. The day goes something like this. The children are in the classroom at their desks and you try to teach them colors or number, but they just run around. Another toddler throws a tantrum and won’t get off the floor, another toddler is running around the room, so you say “nao corre,” ( don’t run) and they keep doing it anyway, so then they bump their head. Then you have to pick the baby up and rub their head and say “onde doi,carinha?” Then they go and play and watch a video, they eat lunch and then finally they lay down and take a nap…yada yada yada

We taught them to play musical chairs and ring around the rosie. They got how to play the game and they did wonderful. When we tried to teach them how to say “around,” in English when they went around in a circle, they kept saying “rooow rooow,” they couldn’t quite pronounce it, but it was cute as could be. So, they’re cute and eveyrthing, it just takes a lot of energy, you have to jump up and down with them, feed them and watch them etc… Taking care of children is hard, especially when you have a language barrier, but I’ll manage.

 

Working in Brazilian Daycare

7 thoughts on “Working in Brazilian Daycare

  1. B. R. says:

    Thanks for the post, Peanut…I think the more you can get away from your fellow workers, the better it will be . Get together with your bro and ditch them after work. Great what you did for that little girl.Too bad they are so uptight about their bodies…you saw it for what it was exactly

    You are so right about the mixture in Brazil, it is a never ending fascination

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  2. Iris says:

    Hi Peanut.

    Thanks for posting about your experiences. I find it really interesting to read about. Sorry you have to deal with all this passive aggressive racism from the White volunteers. I agree with B.R. that you should keep away from them. It’s a shame I can’t do the same with the people I hear that kind of racism from! It might not seem like much at the time, but it builds up and up and can do a lot of damage.

    I don’t think you need to explain much about feeling these White people’s comments are `off’. Most of us have experienced it ourselves and have later found our hunches are correct when that same person comes out with a more obviously racist comment. It’s like having a sixth sense.

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    1. Peanut says:

      thanks Iris, i redid the post because I didn’t want to come off the way I did in this one: https://blacknotwhitedippedinchocolate.wordpress.com/2012/11/07/do-over-my-experience-with-passive-aggressive-racism-in-brazil/
      I agree about your last paragraph though:
      “I don’t think you need to explain much about feeling these White people’s comments are `off’. Most of us have experienced it ourselves and have later found our hunches are correct when that same person comes out with a more obviously racist comment. It’s like having a sixth sense.”

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  3. I think it’s just culture shock. Being a minority myself, I KNOW most of my peers are racist, and so am I against blond Christians to some extent. I just tend to assume anyone with light hair and a short nose is an idiot and therefore more likely to be on drugs/ not a virgin/ violent. When you’re a majority and you go somewhere where you’re a minority, it’s really terrifying. That’s why Israelis tend not to like America very much, even secular ones.

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  4. sharina says:

    I just finished reading and your experience just seems so darn exciting. There seems to be challenges with race every where you go, but you are strong and brave for having the courage to travel in the first place. The courage to see and explore what may seem like the unknown at first. I applaud you and good luck.

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